TOUR IS FULL–The Flâneur & The City: Broadway Tour #2

THIS TOUR IS FULL. SIGNUPS ARE CLOSED.

For the latest installment of urban historian Richard Schave’s site-specific discussion series “The Flâneur & The City,” Richard (Esotouric bus adventuresIn SRO Land) is joined by architectural historian Nathan Marsak (1947project, On Bunker Hill).

On this excursion we’ll be casting our eyes northward along Broadway, from 6th Street up to 4th Street, an area that is part of the National Register designation footprint. Broadway has been a vibrant commercial artery and transit hub of Los Angeles since the 1890s, and we’ll explore that rich history with a focus on the buildings, their architects, and their varied uses. This tour will be slightly different from others in this series, as nearly all of the buildings under discussion still survive.  

Tour guests will gather upstairs at Les Noces du Figaro as the LAVA Sunday Salon concludes. Please note that the final presentation of the free LAVA Sunday Salon immediately preceding this tour is important back story to the tour and your attendance at the Salon is encouraged. You do not have to register in order to attend the free Salon, but to ensure a space on this free walking tour please be sure to register at the link above.

 

ABOUT THE TOUR SERIES: “The Flâneur & The City” is an ongoing attempt to explore some of the more important issues revealed by the constantly changing heart of the metropolis. The core notion of the series is of culture and history as commodities that are packaged and sold to a target demographic; meanwhile, it’s the ignored and seemingly worthless scraps of meaning found on the sidewalks and marketplaces where the true remnants of positive public space can be found. All interpretations and nuisances of the word flâneur are examined—from the modern-day aesthete dreaming of Baudelaire while carried along in the human tide past the stalls and shops of Broadway, to its more recent and perhaps relevant use, someone who is loitering. At its heart this series is a celebration of the simple act of getting out of your car, walking through a neighborhood and learning to see it with your own eyes.